Chodesh Iyar: Love from a Distance

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This video is class 4 of 54 in the series Greatest of Gifts: Sefirat HaOmer and Shavuot.

In this shiur (Torah class), Rabbi Hershel Reichman discusses the unique spiritual characteristics of the month of Iyar. As the month in between Pesach and Shavuot, Iyar represents a more distant relationship with G-d. Yet, despite this distance, Rabbi Reichman explains the strong connection that bonds the Jewish people with the Almighty.

Sefirat Haomer: Joy and Mourning

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This video is class 8 of 54 in the series Greatest of Gifts: Sefirat HaOmer and Shavuot.

In this class on Sefirat Haomer, Rabbi Beinish Ginsburg discusses the dichotomy of sefirat haomer; on one hand, it is a time of joyous anticipation before Matan Torah, and on the other hand, it is a time of mourning for the deaths of the students of Rabbi Akiva. The class explains how it all fits together.

Dimensions of Sefirat HaOmer

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This video is class 10 of 54 in the series Greatest of Gifts: Sefirat HaOmer and Shavuot.

In this class, Mrs. Shira Smiles discusses that we cannot get caught up only in the technical requirements of counting each night of the Omer and the customs of mourning during this time. Sefirat Haomer is a time for spiritual accounting in preparation for receiving the Torah, specifically in the areas of loving one’s fellow man and increasing our consciousness of G-d.

Shavuot: Naaseh V’Nishma

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This video is class 18 of 54 in the series Greatest of Gifts: Sefirat HaOmer and Shavuot.

In this Torah shiur (class) in honor of Shavuot, Rabbi Beinish Ginsburg discusses three possible ways to understand the words ‘Naaseh V’Nishma’, the declaration made by the Jewish People as they accepted the Torah. Rabbi Ginsburg explains how these words can help each individual prepare for their personal Kabbalat HaTorah on Shavuot.

Shavuot: Expanding Reality

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This video is class 30 of 54 in the series Greatest of Gifts: Sefirat HaOmer and Shavuot.

In this shiur (Torah class) on Shavuot, Mrs. Shira Smiles points out that the Torah was supposed to be given on Friday, the fiftieth day of the omer, but was in fact given on Shabbat, the fifty-first. Mrs. Shira Smiles discusses some of the questions regarding this reality. Why did Moshe add an extra day of preparation at har sinai? If the world was waiting since creation for the acceptance of the Torah on Friday, how could Moshe push it off? If the Torah was given on the seventh day of Sivan, then why is the sixth day of Sivan referred to as the day we received the Torah?